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Speech Rate and Syllable Durations in Stutterers and Nonstutterers

  • Paul Schäfersküpper
  • Michael Dames

Abstract

Recent research on stuttering has focused on time and timing aspects of general motor and speech motor control. For example, reaction time measurements have shown stutterers to be slower than nonstutterers (Adams & Hayden, 1976; Schäfersküpper, 1981; Starkweather et al., 1984; Peters & Hulstijn, 1986; Watson, 1986).

Keywords

Reading Time Speech Rate Voice Onset Time Hearing Research Speech Motor 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Schäfersküpper
  • Michael Dames

There are no affiliations available

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