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Voice Onset Abruptness in Stutterers Before and After Therapy

  • Ronald L. Webster
  • Bryant T. Morgan
  • Maurice W. Cannon

Abstract

In most research and clinical work on stuttering, recognition of stuttered speech is accomplished directly by an observer or observers. The observer is the instrument for identifying and quantifying characteristics of stuttered speech. Specific interests and perceptual skills of investigators determine the level of resolution attained in observation. Typically, resolution has ranged from global ratings of stuttering severity (Johnson, Darley and Spriestersbach, 1963), to frequency counts of a few particular types of disfluency (Williams, Darley and Spriestersbach, 1978) to more “molecular” levels in which numerous disfluency types are elaborated (L.M. Webster and Brutten, 1972). In spite of the diversity of events examined by different investigators, it seems clear that the focal features of stuttered speech involve aberrant properties of speech muscle activity, many of which are simply not readily available for direct, unaided human observation.

Keywords

Speech Signal Speech Sample Voice Onset Time Speech Motor Fluent Speech 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald L. Webster
  • Bryant T. Morgan
  • Maurice W. Cannon

There are no affiliations available

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