Advertisement

A Speech Motor Control Perspective on Stuttering: Preliminary Observations

  • Anthony J. Caruso
  • Vincent L. Gracco
  • James H. Abbs

Abstract

Most physiological investigations of stutterers’ speech productions have focused on descriptive measures of muscular events and structural movements, air pressures and flows, and the resulting acoustic waveform during instances of stuttering. Specifically, during moments of stuttering, stutterers have difficulty producing: (1) proper onsets, offsets, transitions, and durations of muscle (in)activation prior to or during stuttering (Sheehan & Voas, 1954; Ford & Luper, 1975; Metz, Conture & Colton, 1976; Freeman & Ushijima, 1978; Shapiro, 1980; Stromsta & Fibiger, 1980), (2) appropriate degrees of muscle excitation (Sheehan & Voas, 1954; Ford & Luper, 1975; Freeman & Ushijima, 1978; Shapiro, 1980; Stromsta & Fibiger, 1980; McClean, Goldsmith & Cerf, 1984), and (3) appropriate timing of lip, jaw and tongue movements (Hutchinson & Watkin, 1976; Zimmermann, 1980b, 1980c).

Keywords

Hearing Research Speech Motor Fluent Speech Normal Speaker Speech Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abbs, J. H. & Gracco, V.L. (1982). Motor control of multi-movement behaviors: Orofacial muscle responses to load perturbations of the lips during speech. Society for Neuroscience, 8, 282. (Abstract)Google Scholar
  2. Abbs, J.H. & Gracco, V.L. (1984). Control of complex motor gestures: Orofacial muscle responses to load perturbations of the lip during speech. Journal of Neurophysiology, 51, 705–723.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Adams, M.R. & Hayden, P. (1976). The ability of stutterers and nonstutterers to initiate and terminate phonation during production of an isolated vowel. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 19, 290–296.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Agnello, J.G. (1975). Voice onset and voice termination features of stuttering. In L.M. Webster & L.C. Furst (Eds.), Vocal tract dynamics and dysfluency. New York: Speech and Hearing Institute.Google Scholar
  5. Baken, R.J., McManus, D.A. & Cavallo, S. (1983). Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 26, 444–450.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Barlow, S.M., Cole, K.J. & Abbs, J.H. (1983). A new headmounted lip-jaw movement transduction system for the study of motor speech disorders. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 26, 283–288.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Caruso, A.J., Conture, E.G. & Colton, R.H. (1986). Speech physiology associated with young stutterers’ stutterings. A paper submitted to Journal of Speech and Hearing Research.Google Scholar
  8. Conture, E.G., Rothenberg, M. & Molitor, R. (1986). Electroglottographic observations of young stutterers’ fluency. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 29, 384–393.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. DeLong, M. (1971). Central control of movement. In E.V. Evarts, E. Bizzi, R.E. Burke, M. DeLong & W.T. Trach (Eds.), Neurosciences Research Program Bulletin, 9 (1), 10–30.Google Scholar
  10. Folkins, J.W. & Abbs, J.H. (1975). Lip and jaw motor control during speech: Responses to resistive loading of the jaw. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 18, 207–222.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Folkins, J.W. & Abbs, J.H. (1976). Additional observations on responses to resistive loading of the jaw. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 19, 820–821.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Ford, S. & Luper, H. (1975). Aerodynamic, phonatory, and labial EMC patterns during fluent and stuttered speech. Paper presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention.Google Scholar
  13. Freeman, F. & Ushijima, T. (1978). Laryngeal muscle activity during stuttering. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 21, 538–562.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Gracco, V.L. & Abbs, J.H. (1982). Temporal response characteristics of the perioral system to load perturbations. Society for Neuroscience, 8 (part 1), 282. (Abstract)Google Scholar
  15. Gracco, V.L. & Abbs, J.H. (1985). Dynamic control of the perioral system during speech: Kinematic analyses of autogenic and nonautogenic sensorimotor processes. Journal of Neurophysiology, 54 (2), 418–432.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Hayden, P. & Jordahl, N. (1979). Stutterers’ voice initiation times during conditions of novel stimuli. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 21, 693. (Abstract)Google Scholar
  17. Hutchinson, J. & Watkin, K.L. (1976). Jaw mechanics during release of the stuttering moment: Some initial observations and interpretations. Journal of Communication Disorders, 9, 269–279.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Kelso, J.A.S., Tuller, B., Bateson, E. & Fowler, C. (1984). Functionally specific articulatory cooperation following jaw perturbations during speech: Evidence for coordinative structures. Journal of Experimental Psychology (Hum. Percept.), 10, 812–832.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Lindblom, B., Lubker, J. & Gay, T. (1979). Formant frequencies of some fixed mandible vowels and a model of speech motor programming by predictive simulation. Journal of Phonetics, 7, 147–161.Google Scholar
  20. MacNeilage, P.F. (1970). Motor control of serial ordering of speech. Psychological Review, 3, 182–196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. McClean, M., Goldsmith, H. & Cerf, A. (1984). Lower-lip EMG and displacement during bilabial disfluencies in adult stutterers. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 27, 342–349.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Metz, D.E., Conture, E.G. & Colton, R. (1976). Temporal relationships among respiratory and laryngeal systems prior to fluent and stuttered utterances. ASHA, 18, 664. (Abstract)Google Scholar
  23. Neilson, P.D., Andrews, G., Guitar, B.E. & Quinn, P.T. (1979). Tonic stretch reflexes in lip, tongue and jaw muscles. Brain Research, 178, 311–328.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Reich, A., Till, J. & Goldsmith, H. (1981). Laryngeal and manual reaction times of stuttering and nonstuttering adults. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 24, 192–196.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Shapiro, A. (1980). An electromyographic analysis of the fluent and dysfluent utterances of several types of stutterers. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 5, 293–331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Sheehan, J. & Voas, R.B. (1954). Tension patterns during stuttering in relation to conflict, anxiety-binding, and reinforcement. Speech Monographs, 21, 272–279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Smith, A. & Luschei, E.S. (1983). Assessment of oral-motor reflexes in stutterers and normal speakers: Preliminary observations. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 26 (3), 322–328.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Starkweather, C.W., Hirschman, P. & Tannenbaum, R.S. (1976) Latency of vocalization: Stutterers versus nonstutterers. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 19, 481–492.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  29. Stromsta, C. & Fibiger, S. (1980). Physiological correlates of the core behavior of stuttering. Paper presented to the XVIIIth IALP Congress, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  30. Sussman, H.M., MacNeilage, P.F. & Hanson, R.J. (1973). Labial and mandibular movement dynamics during the production of bilabial stop consonants. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 16, 397–420.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. Van Riper, C. (1982). The Nature of Stuttering. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.Google Scholar
  32. Watson, B.C. & Alfonso, P.J. (1982). Comparison of LRT and VOT values between stutterers and nonstutterers. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 7, 219–242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Zimmermann, G. (1980a). Articulatory dynamics of fluent utterances of stutterers and nonstutterers. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 23, 95–107.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Zimmermann, G. (1980b). Articulatory behaviors associated with stuttering: A cinefluorographic analysis. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 23, 108–121.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. Zimmermann, G. (1980c). Stuttering: A disorder of movement. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 23, 122–136.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  36. Zimmermann, G. & Hanley, J.M. (1983). A cinefluorographic investigation of repeated fluent productions of stutterers in an adaptation procedure. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 26, 35–42.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony J. Caruso
  • Vincent L. Gracco
  • James H. Abbs

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations