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Subgrouping Young Stutterers: A Physiological Perspective

  • Howard D. Schwartz

Abstract

Identification and description of subgroups of stutterers has been related to both the etiology and treatment of stuttering (Preus, 1981). Andrews and Harris (1964) proposed an etiological classification where they attempted to group young stutterers by using a large number of psycho-social variables, for example, birth order, child rearing practices and intelligence. Treatment subgroups were examined by Douglass and Quarrington (1952) who suggested that diagnostic procedures would reveal different types of stutterers who may require different types of therapeutic management. In a somewhat different manner, Prins and Lohr (1972), examined the characteristics of the stuttered speech and described the different speech and nonspeech behaviors associated with the production of stuttered words. These investigators suggested that quantification of behaviors associated with stuttering may have implications for the manner in which we consider “etiologies and therapies” for stuttering.

Keywords

Hearing Research Fluent Speech Conversational Speech Articulatory Production Interjudge Reliability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard D. Schwartz

There are no affiliations available

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