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Laryngeal and Articulatory Behavior in Stuttering: Past and Future

  • C. Woodruff Starkweather

Abstract

The purposes of this chapter are to describe the history from which the current ideas relating stuttering to concepts of speech motor control have been derived, to review some current studies, and to look ahead to the future of research in this area. It all began with Wingate’s (1976) review of the conditions under which stuttering is wholly or partially relieved, an area we have come to call “fluency enhancement”. Wingate concluded that what the fluency enhancing conditions had in common was a tendency to produce speech that prolonged and emphasized vocalization. For a while, there was a spate of research on laryngeal behavior in stuttering. As it turned out, Wingate’s review failed to make clear that in addition to altered laryngeal behavior, most of the fluency enhancing conditions also altered the rate of speaking. Later, in a comprehensive experimental study of the speech changes produced by fluency enhancing conditions, Andrews (1982) would show that altered rate of speaking was also common to fluency enhancement conditions and that changes in vocalization were likely to be a by-product of changes in rate.

Keywords

Speech Production Speech Rate Voice Onset Time Hearing Research Vowel Duration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1987

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  • C. Woodruff Starkweather

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