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Serological and biological relationships among viruses in the bean common mosaic virus subgroup

  • G. I. Mink
  • M. J. Silbernagel
Part of the Archives of Virology book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 5)

Summary

Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV), blackeye cowpea mosaic virus (B1CMV), cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), azuki bean mosaic virus (AzMV), and peanut stripe virus (PStV) are five species of the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae which are seed-transmitted in beans or cowpeas. Eighteen isolates of BCMV, five isolates of B1CMV, four isolates of CABMV, and one isolate each of AzMV, and PStV were compared serologically using a panel of 13 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against BCMV, B1CMV, CABMV, or PStV in indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Four MAbs detected all virus isolates; one detected all isolates except those of CABMV. Three MAbs were specific only for serotype A isolates of BCMV Four MAbs detected all serotype B isolates of BCMV plus all isolates of B1CMV, AzMV, and PStV. None of the antibodies distinguished among these four viruses. However, in biological tests with 11 bean cultivars selected for differentiating BCMV pathotypes, all isolates of B1CMV, AzMV, and PStV could be differentiated from the BCMV serotype B isolates by their reactions on a few bean cultivars in host group I and the cowpea cultivar California Blackeye #5. Potential problems that can arise from the use of nonauthenticated isolates are also discussed.

Keywords

Mosaic Virus Soybean Mosaic Virus Bean Cultivar Host Group Bean Common Mosaic Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. I. Mink
    • 1
    • 3
  • M. J. Silbernagel
    • 2
  1. 1.Washington State University Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension CenterProsserUSA
  2. 2.Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension CenterU.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research ServiceProsserUSA
  3. 3.WSU-Prosser IARECProsserUSA

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