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Fungal transmission of a potyvirus: uredospores of Puccinia sorghi transmit maize dwarf mosaic virus

  • M. B. v. Wechmar
  • R. Chauhan
  • E. Knox
Part of the Archives of Virology book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 5)

Summary

Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and maize rust, Puccinia sorghi Schw., occur as natural infections on cultivated maize in South Africa. P. sorghi often occurs as a secondary late infection on maize plants which have already been infected with MDMV earlier in the season, either seed or aphid transmitted. When MDMV isolates from maize plants naturally infected by both virus and fungus were propagated by sap inoculation in plant growth rooms, residual uredospores in the sap gave rise to the development of uredia under conditions of high humidity. When uredospores developing on MDMV-B-infected plants were germinated on virus free maize seedlings, these plants became infected with MDMV-B. Similarly, when uredospores, originating from maize plants infected with MDMV-A, were scattered onto virus free maize seedlings, these plants became infected with MDMV-A.

The presence of virus on uredospores in infected plant tissue was visualized by indirect immunofluorescence. Identification of virus infection was by DAS-ELISA and immunoelectro—blotting utilizing strain—specific antisera. Virus transmission occurred between closely situated plants which had no actual contact (unaided transmission). MDMV-B transmission by uredospores, to new maize seedlings, has been maintained for three successive years (1988–1991) in a plant growth room. The MDMV-B isolate remained sap and non—persistently aphid transmissible.

Keywords

Maize Seedling Leaf Section Commercial Hybrid Rust Infection Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. B. v. Wechmar
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Chauhan
    • 1
  • E. Knox
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Cape TownRondeboschSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Cape TownRondeboschSouth Africa

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