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Sources of resistance to viruses in the Potyviridae

  • R. Provvidenti
  • R. O. Hampton
Part of the Archives of Virology book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 5)

Summary

Resistance to 56 viruses in the family Potyviridae in 334 plant species was tabulated. Studies conducted in the last 60 years have elucidated the genetics and usefulness of 135 resistance genes, but no reports on the heritability of other sources of resistance are available. In most of the plant species, resistance to species of Potyviridae was simply inherited, either dominantly (60 genes) or recessively (39 genes). In some cases resistance was conferred by two or more genes. Symbols have been assigned to 86 genes, of which very few are duplicate entities. Resistance genes can be useful in determining relationships among these viruses, as well as for their identification. The role of conventional breeding and biotechnology in transferring genes from one species to another is discussed.

Keywords

Mosaic Virus Potato Virus Yellow Mosaic Virus Soybean Mosaic Virus Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Provvidenti
    • 1
    • 3
  • R. O. Hampton
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plant PathologyNew York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Cornell UniversityGenevaUSA
  2. 2.Agricultural Research Service, Department of Botany and Plant PathologyUS Department of Agriculture, Oregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  3. 3.Department of Plant Pathology, D.W. Barton LaboratoryCornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment StationGenevaUSA

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