Advertisement

Serological relationships involving potyviral nonstructural proteins

  • D. E. Purcifull
  • E. Hiebert
Part of the Archives of Virology book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 5)

Summary

This report represents a compilation of many of the publications on antigenic properties of potyviral-specified nonstructural proteins. Polyclonal antisera have been prepared for use in characterization of six nonstructural proteins. These include antisera to the cylindrical inclusion proteins of at least 28 potyviruses, to small nuclear inclusion protein (protease) of four potyviruses, to large nuclear inclusion protein (putative replicase) of three viruses, helper component-protease or amorphous inclusion protein of at least four viruses, to the P1 protein (located at the N-terminus of the polyprotein) of one virus, and to the P3 protein (located between helper component protease and cylindrical inclusion protein) of one virus. Monoclonal antibodies also have been prepared to several of these nonstructural proteins. The evidence thus far indicates that cylindrical inclusions of different potyviruses have both conserved and unique epitopes. Nuclear inclusion proteins and amorphous inclusion proteins also may have conserved and unique epitopes. Antigenic relationships of potyviral nonstructural proteins have potential for the identification and classification of potyviruses.

Keywords

Tobacco Etch Virus Nuclear Inclusion Cylindrical Inclusion Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus Inclusion Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Alconero R, Provvidenti R, Gonsalves D (1986) Three pea seedborne mosaic virus pathotypes from pea and lentil germ plasm. Plant Dis 70: 783–786.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Baker CA (1989) Production and characterization of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to three virus-induced proteins of papaya ringspot virus type W. PhD dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Baker CA, Purcifull DE (1987) Serological relationships of three proteins of papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV-W) to antigens of zucchini yellow fleck virus (ZYFV). Phytopathology 77: 1722.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Baker CA, Purcifull DE (1988) Reactivity of a monoclonal antibody to the amorphous inclusion protein of papaya ringspot virus-type W (PRSV-W). Phytopathology 78:1537.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Baker CA, Purcifull DE (1990) Reactivity of two monoclonal antibodies to the cylindrical inclusion protein of papaya ringspot virus type W. Phytopathology 80: 1033.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Batchelor DL (1974) Immunogenicity of sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured plant viruses and plant viral inclusions. PhD dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Baum RH (1980) Purification, partial characterization, and serology of the capsid and cylindrical inclusion proteins of four isolates of watermelon mosaic virus. PhD dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Baum RH, Purcifull DE (1981) Serology of cylindrical inclusions of several watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) isolates. Phytopathology 71: 202.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Baunoch DA, Das P, Hari V (1988) Intracellular localization of TEV capsid and inclusion proteins by immunogold labelling. J Ultrastruct Mol Struct Res 99: 203–212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Baunoch, DA, Das P, Hari V (1990) Potato virus Y helper component protein is associated with amorphous inclusions. J Gen Virol 71: 2479–2482.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Baunoch DA, Das P, Browning ME, Hari V (1991) A temporal study of the expression of the capsid, cytoplasmic inclusion and nuclear inclusion proteins of tobacco etch potyvirus in infected plants. J Gen Virol 72: 487–492.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Baunoch, DA, Das P, Hari V (1991) Epitope analysis of the CIP of tobacco etch virus. Phytopathology 81: 1147.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Berger PH, Hunt AG, Domier LL, Hellmann GM, Stram Y, Thornbury DW, Pirone TP (1989) Expression in transgenic plants of a viral gene product that mediates insect transmission of potyviruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86: 8402–8406.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Berger PH, Luciano CS, Thornbury DW, Benner HI, Hill JH, Zeyen RJ (1989) Properties and in vitro translation of maize dwarf mosaic virus RNA. J Gen Virol 70: 1845–1851.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Brakke MK, Ball EM, Hsu YH, Langenberg WG (1987) Wheat streak mosaic virus cylindrical inclusion body protein. J Gen Virol 68: 281–287.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Carrington JC, Dougherty WG (1987) Small nuclear inclusion protein encoded by a plant potyvirus genome is a protease. J Virol 61: 2540–2548.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Carrington JC, Cary SM, Parks DT, Dougherty WG (1989) A second proteinase encoded by a plant potyvirus genome. EMBO J 8: 365–370.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Carrington JC, Freed DD, Oh C-S (1990) Expression of potyviral polyproteins in transgenic plants reveals three proteolytic activities required for complete processing. EMBO J 9: 1347–1353.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Chang C-A (1986) Bean yellow mosaic and clover yellow vein viruses: purification, characterization, detection and antigenic relationships of their nuclear inclusion proteins. PhD dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Chang C-A (1990) A one step identification of bean yellow mosaic and clover yellow vein potyviruses by detection of virus specific antigen in infected tissue. In: Proceedings of the VIII International Congress for Virology, Berlin, p 446.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Chang C-A, Purcifull DE, Hiebert E (1985) Purification and partial characterization of nuclear inclusions induced by a pea mosaic isolate of bean yellow mosaic virus. Phytopathology 75: 499.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Chang C-A, Purcifull DE, Hiebert E, Edwardson JR (1986) Immunofluorescence evidence for the origin of nuclear inclusion and cytoplasmic crystals induced by bean yellow mosaic virus. Phytopathology 76: 1061.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Chang C-A, Hiebert E, Purcifull DE (1988) Purification, characterization, and immunological analysis of nuclear inclusions induced by bean yellow mosaic and clover yellow vein potyviruses. Phytopathology 78: 1266–1275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Chang C-A, Hiebert E, Purcifull DE (1988) Analysis of in vitro translation of bean yellow mosaic virus RNA: inhibition of proteolytic processing by antiserum to the 49K nuclear inclusion protein. J Gen Virol 69: 1117–1122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Christie RG, Edwardson JR (1977) Light and electron microscopy of plant virus inclusions. Fla Agric Exp Stat Monogr, no 9.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    DeMejia MVG, Hiebert E, Purcifull DE (1985) Isolation and partial characterization of the amorphous cytoplasmic inclusions associated with infections caused by two potyviruses. Virology 142: 24–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    deMejia MVG, Hiebert E, Purcifull D, Thornbury DW, Pirone TP (1985) Identification of potyviral amorphous inclusion protein as a nonstructural, virus-specific protein related to helper component. Virology 142: 34–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Domier LL, Shaw JG, Rhoads RE (1987) Potyviral proteins share amino acid sequence homology with picorna-, como-, and caulimovirus proteins. Virology 158: 20–27.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Dougherty WG, Hiebert E (1980) Translation of potyvirus RNA in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate: identification of nuclear inclusion proteins as products of tobacco etch virus RNA translation and cylindrical inclusion protein as a product of the potyvirus genome. Virology 104: 174–182.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Dougherty WG, Carrington, JC (1988) Expression and function of potyviral gene products. Annu Rev Phytopathol 26: 12343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Dougherty WA, Parks TD (1991) Post-translational processing of the tobacco etch virus 49-kDa small nuclear inclusion polyprotein, identification of an internal cleavage site and delineation of VPg and proteinase domains. Virology 183: 449–456.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Edwardson JR (1974) Some properties of the potato virus-Y group. Fla Agric Exp Stat Monogr, no 4.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Edwardson JR, Christie RG (1978) Use of virus-induced inclusions in classification and diagnosis. Annu Rev Phytopathol 16: 31–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Edwardson JR, Christie RG (1991) The potyvirus group. Fla Agric Exp Stat Monogr, no 16, vols I-IV.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Garcia JA, Riechmann JL, Lain S (1989) Proteolytic activity of the plum pox potyvirus NIa-like protein in Escherichia coli. Virology 170: 362–369.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    Gorbalenya AE, Blinov VM, Donchenkoae, Koonin EV (1989) An NTP-binding motif is the most conserved sequence in a highly diverged monophyletic group of proteins involved in positive strand RNA viral replication. J Mol Biol 28: 256–268.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Govier DA, Kassanis B, Pirone TP (1977) Partial purification and characterization of the potato Y helper component. Virology 78: 306–314.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. 38.
    Graybosch R, Hellmann GM, Shaw JG, Rhoads RE, Hunt AG (1989) Expression of a potyvirus non-structural protein in transgenic tobacco. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 160: 425–432.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Habili N, Symons RH (1989) Evolutionary relationship between luteoviruses and other RNA plant viruses based on sequence motifs in their putative RNA polymerases and nucleic acid helicases. Nucleic Acids Res 17: 9543–9555.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    Hammond J (1989) Antisera to cytoplasmic inclusion proteins of potyviruses contain cross-reactive antibodies. Phytopathology 79: 1174.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Hammond J, Lawson RH (1988) An improved purification procedure for preparing potyviruses and cytoplasmic inclusions from the same tissue. J Virol Methods 20: 203–217.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    Hellmann GM, Thornbury DW, Hiebert E, Shaw JG, Pirone TP, Rhoads RE (1983) Cell-free translation of tobacco vein mottling virus RNA. Virology 124: 434–444.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    Hellmann GM, Shaw JG, Rhoads RE (1988) In vitro analysis of tobacco vein mottling virus NIa cistron: evidence for a virus-encoded protease. Virology 163: 554–562.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    Hiebert E, Charudattan R (1984) Characterization of araujia mosaic virus by in vitro translation analyses. Phytopathology 74: 642–646.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    Hiebert E, Dougherty WG (1988) Organization and expression of the viral genomes. In: Milne RG (ed) The plant viruses, vol 4, the filamentous viruses. Plenum, New York, pp 159–178.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Hiebert E, McDonald JG (1973) Characterization of some proteins associated with viruses in the potato Y group. Virology 56: 349–361.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. 47.
    Hiebert E, Purcifull DE, Christie RG, Christie SR (1971) Partial purification of inclusions induced by tobacco etch virus and potato virus Y. Virology 43: 638–646.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. 48.
    Hiebert E, Purcifull DE, Christie RG (1984) Purification and immunological analysis of plant viral inclusion bodies. In: Maramorosh K, Koprowski H (eds) Methods in virology, vol 8. Academic Press, San Diego, pp 225–280.Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    Hiebert E, Thornbury DW, Pirone TP (1984) Immunoprecipitation analysis of potyviral in vitro translation products using antisera to helper component of tobacco vein mottling virus and potato virus Y. Virology 135: 1–9.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. 50.
    Jensen SG, Staudinger JL (1989) Serological grouping of the cytoplasmic inclusions of 6 strains of sugarcane mosaic virus. Phytopathology 79: 1215.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    Jordan R, Hammond J (1991) Comparison and differentiation of potyvirus isolates and identification of strain-, virus-, subgroup-specific and potyvirus group-common epitopes using monoclonal antibodies. J Gen Virol 72: 25–36.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    Karchi H (1989) Expression of the full-length genome of potato virus Y (PVY) in Escherichia coli cells: polyprotein processing and viral proteins activities. MS thesis, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem.Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    Kassanis B (1939) Intranuclear inclusions in virus-infected plants. Ann Appl Biol 26: 705–709.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. 54.
    Knuhtsen H, Hiebert E, Purcifull DE (1974) Partial purification and some properties of tobacco etch virus induced intranuclear inclusions. Virology 61: 200–209.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. 55.
    Ko N-J (1987) LR White embedding for immunogold labelling of virus-infected plant tissues. Proc Nat Sci Council (Taiwan) [B]: 206–210.Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    Koenig R (1988) Serology and immunochemistry. In: Milne RG (ed) The plant viruses, vol 4, the filamentous viruses. Plenum, New York, pp 111–158.Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Lain S, Riechmann JL, Martin MT, Garcia JA (1989) Homologous potyvirus and flavivirus proteins belonging to a superfamily of helicase-like proteins. Gene 82: 357–362.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. 58.
    Lain S, Martin MT, Riechmann JL, Garcia JA (1991) Novel catalytic activity associated with positive-strand RNA virus infection: nucleic acid-stimulated ATPase activity of the plum pox potyvirus helicase-like protein. J Virol 65: 1–6.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  59. 59.
    Langenberg WG (1991) Cylindrical inclusion bodies of wheat streak mosaic virus and three other potyviruses only self-assemble in mixed infections. J Gen Virol 72: 493–497.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. 60.
    Lecoq H, Bourdin D, Raccah B, Hiebert E, Purcifull D E (1991) Characterization of a zucchini yellow mosaic virus isolate with a deficient helper component. Phytopathology 81: 1087–1091.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. 61.
    Lesemann DE (1988) Cytopathology. In: Milne RG (ed) The plant viruses, vol 4, the filamentous viruses. Plenum, New York, pp 179–235.Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    Lima JAA, Purcifull DE (1980) Immunochemical and microscopical techniques for detecting blackeye cowpea mosaic and soybean mosaic viruses in hypocotyls of germinated seeds. Phytopathology 70: 142–147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. 63.
    Lima JAA, Purcifull DE, Hiebert E (1979) Purification, partial characterization, and serology of blackeye cowpea mosaic virus. Phytopathology 69: 1252–1258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. 64.
    Lin N-S, Wang N, Hsu Y-H (1988) Sequential appearance of capsid protein and cylindrical inclusion protein in root-tip cells following infection with passion fruit woodiness virus. J Ultrastruct Mol Struct Res 100: 201–211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. 65.
    Luciano CS, Rhoads RE, Shaw JG (1987) Synthesis of potyviral RNA and proteins in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts inoculated by electroporation. Plant Sci 51: 295–303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. 66.
    Luciano CS, Gibb KS, Berger PH (1989) A general method for the detection of potyviral gene products in plant protoplasts and tissue. J Virol Methods 24: 347–356.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. 67.
    Martelli GP, Russo M (1977) Plant virus inclusion bodies. Adv Virus Res 21: 175–266.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. 68.
    Martin MT, Otin CL, Lain S, Garcia JA (1990) Determination of polyprotein processing sites by amino terminal sequencing of nonstructural proteins encoded by plum pox potyvirus. Virus Res 15: 97–106.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. 69.
    McDonald JG, Hiebert E (1975) Characterization of the capsid and cylindrical inclusion proteins of three strains of turnip mosaic virus. Virology 63: 295–303.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. 70.
    Mowat WP, Dawson S, Duncan GH (1989) Production of antiserum to a non-structural potyviral protein and its use to detect narcissus yellow stripe and other potyviruses. J Virol Methods 25: 199–210.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. 70a.
    Mowat WP, Dawson S, Duncan GH, Robinson DJ (1991) Narcissus latent, a virus with filamentous particles and a novel combination of properties. Ann Appl Biol 119: 31–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. 71.
    Murphy JF, Jarlfors U, Shaw JG (1991) Development of cylindrical inclusions in poty virus-infected protoplasts. Phytopathology 81: 371–374.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. 72.
    Murphy JF, Rhoads RE, Hunt AG, Shaw JG (1990) The VPg of tobacco etch virus RNA is the 49-kDa protease or the N-terminal 24-kDa part of the proteinase. Virology 178: 285–288.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. 73.
    Nagel J, Hiebert E (1985) Complementary DNA cloning and expression of the papaya ringspot potyvirus sequence encoding capsid protein and a nuclear inclusion-like protein in Escherichia coli. Virology 143: 435–441.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. 74.
    Nagel J, Zettler FW, Hiebert E (1983) Strains of bean yellow mosaic virus compared to clover yellow vein virus in relation to gladiolus production in Florida. Phytopathology 73: 449–454.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. 75.
    Noda C, Maeda T, Inouye N (1988) Isopycnic separation of potyviral cylindrical inclusions by sucrose potassium tartrate density gradient centrifugation. Ann Phytopathol Soc Jpn 54: 319–322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. 76.
    Parks TD, Dougherty WG (1991) Substrate recognition by the NIa proteinase of two potyviruses involves multiple domains: characterization using genetically engineered hybrid proteinase molecules. Virology 182: 17–27.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. 77.
    Pirone TP, Thornbury DW (1884) The involvement of a helper component in nonpersistent transmission of plant viruses by aphids. Microbiol Sci 1: 191–193.Google Scholar
  79. 78.
    Provvidenti R, Gonsalves D, Humaydan HS (1984) Occurrence of zucchini yellow mosaic virus in cucurbits from Connecticut, New York, Florida, and California. Plant Dis 68: 443–446.Google Scholar
  80. 79.
    Purcifull DE (1990) Ouchterlony double-diffusion tests in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate for detection of virion proteins and virus-induced inclusion body proteins. In: Hampton R, Ball E, DeBoer S (eds) Serological methods for detection and identification of viral and bacterial plant pathogens. American Phytopathological Society Press, St. Paul, Minn, pp 121–127.Google Scholar
  81. 80.
    Purcifull DE, Batchelor DL (1977) Immunodiffusion tests with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated plant viruses and plant viral inclusions. Fla Agric Exp Stat Tech Bull 788.Google Scholar
  82. 81.
    Purcifull DE, Hiebert E, McDonald JG (1973) Immunochemical specificity of cytoplasmic inclusions induced by viruses in the potato Y group. Virology 55: 275–279.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. 82.
    Purcifull DE, Zitter TA, Hiebert E (1975) Morphology, host range, and serological relationships of pepper mottle virus. Phytopathology 65: 559–562.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. 83.
    Quiot-Douine L, Purcifull DE, Hiebert E, deMejia MVG (1986) Serological relationships and in vitro translation of an antigenically distinct strain of papaya ringspot virus. Phytopathology 76: 346–351.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. 84.
    Quiot-Douine L, Lecoq H, Quiot JB, Pitrat M, Labonne G (1990) Serological and biological variability of virus isolates related to strains of papaya ringspot virus. Phytopathology 80: 256–263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. 85.
    Restrepo MA, Freed DD, Carrington JC (1990) Nuclear transport of plant potyviral proteins. Plant Cell 2: 987–998.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. 86.
    Rodriguez-Cerezo E, Shaw JG (1991) Two newly detected nonstructural viral proteins in potyvirus-infected cells. Virology 185: 572–579.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. 87.
    Shepard JF, Shalla TA (1969) Tobacco etch virus cylindrical inclusions: antigenically unrelated to the causal virus. Virology 38: 185–188.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. 88.
    Shepard JF, Gaard G, Purcifull DE (1974) A study of tobacco etch virus-induced inclusions using indirect immunoferritin procedures. Phytopathology 64: 418–425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. 89.
    Shukla DD, Ward CW (1989) Identification and classification of potyviruses on the basis of coat protein sequence data and serology. Arch Virol 106: 171–200.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. 90.
    Shukla DD, Frenkel MJ, Ward CW (1991) Structure and function of the potyvirus genome with special reference to the coat protein coding region. Can J Plant Pathol 13:178–191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. 91.
    Slade DE, Johnston RE, Dougherty WG (1989) Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies reactive with the 49-kDa proteinase of tobacco etch virus. Virology 173: 499–508.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. 92.
    Suzuki N, Kudo T, Shirako Y, Ehara Y, Tachibana T (1989) Distribution of cylindrical inclusion, amorphous inclusion and capsid proteins of watermelon mosaic virus 2 in systemically infected pumpkin leaves. J Gen Virol 70: 1085–1091.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. 93.
    Suzuki N, Shirako Y, Ehara Y (1990) Isolation and serological comparison of virus-coded proteins of three potyviruses infecting cucurbitaceous plants. Intervirology 31: 43–49.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  95. 94.
    Thornbury DW, Pirone TP (1983) Helper components of two potyviruses are serologically distinct. Virology 125: 487–490.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. 95.
    Thornbury DW, Hellman GM, Rhoads RE, Pirone TP (1985) Purification and characterization of potyvirus helper component. Virology 144: 260–267.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. 96.
    Thornbury DW, Patterson CA, Dessens JT, Pirone TP (1990) Comparative sequence of the helper component (HC) region of potato virus Y and a HC-defective strain, potato virus C. Virology 178: 573–578.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. 97.
    Verchot J, Koonin EV, Carrington JC (1991) The 35 kDa protein from the N-terminus of the potyviral polyprotein functions as a third virus-encoded protease. Virology 185:527–535.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. 98.
    Ward CW, Shukla DD (1991) Taxonomy of potyviruses - current problems and some solutions. Intervirology 32: 269–296.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  100. 99.
    Xiong Z (1985) Purification and partial characterization of peanut mottle virus and detection of peanut stripe virus in peanut seeds. MS thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  101. 100.
    Xiong Z, Purcifull DE, Hiebert E (1985) Purification, serology, and cytology of peanut mottle virus. Phytopathology 75: 1334.Google Scholar
  102. 101.
    Xiong Z, Hiebert E, Purcifull DE (1988) Characterization of the peanut mottle virus genome by in vitro translation. Phytopathology 78: 1128–1134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. 102.
    Yeh S-D, Bih F-Y (1989) Comparative studies on in vitro translation of a severe strain and a mild strain of papaya ringspot virus. Plant Protect Bull 31: 276–289.Google Scholar
  104. 103.
    Yeh S-D, Gonsalves D (1984) Purification and immunological analyses of cylindrical-inclusion protein induced by papaya ringspot virus and watermelon mosaic virus 1. Phytopathology 74: 1273–1278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. 104.
    Yeh S-D, Gonsalves D (1985) Translation of papaya ringspot virus RNA in vitro: detection of a possible polyprotein that is processed for capsid protein, cylindrical inclusion protein, and amorphous-inclusion protein. Virology 143: 260–271.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. 105.
    Yeh S-D, Gonsalves D, Provvidenti R (1984) Comparative studies on host range and serology of papaya ringspot virus and watermelon mosaic virus 1. Phytopathology 74: 1081–1085.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  107. 106.
    Yeh S-D, Wang C-H, Chen M-J (1990) Purification of a 112 K protein of papaya ringspot virus produced in vivo. In: Proceedings of the VIII International Congress for Virology, Berlin, p 471.Google Scholar
  108. 107.
    Zettler FW, Abo El-Nil MM, Hartman RD (1978) Dasheen mosaic virus. CMI/AAB Descriptions of Plant Viruses, no 191.Google Scholar
  109. 108.
    Zurawski, DB (1979) Some biological and serological properties of bidens mottle virus isolated from Fittonia. MS thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. E. Purcifull
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. Hiebert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant Pathology, Institute of Food and Agricultural SciencesUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Plant Pathology, Institute of Food and Agricultural SciencesUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

Personalised recommendations