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Mood Disorders in Heroin Dependence and Clinical Differences Between Heroin Addicts with and without Mood Disorders

  • L. Daini
  • M. R. Capone
  • T. Agueci
  • M. Aglietti
  • O. Zolesi
  • I. Maremmani
Conference paper

Summary

Psychiatric comorbidity for mood disorders, investigated by means of a semistructured interview in 54 consecutive patients admitted to the Dependence-Psychiatry Unit of the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Pisa, was found in 53 subjects when temperamental characteristics and family history were considered. A comparative study of the clinical characteristics of heroin addicts with and without mood disorders showed that there is a shorter latent period between first use and continued use of heroin in subjects with mood disorders. It would seem that mood disorders do not influence the course of drug addiction, which in our patients always reached the “revolving door” phase and that MMTPs are also needed in the case of psychiatric comorbidity. Our results show that in subjects suffering from mood disorders (primary or secondary) the transition to dependency occurs in a shorter period of time. These results indicate the importance of the early psychiatric diagnosis in heroin dependence.

Keywords

Bipolar Disorder Affective Disorder Mood Disorder Depressive Episode Positive Family History 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Daini
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. R. Capone
    • 1
  • T. Agueci
    • 1
  • M. Aglietti
    • 1
  • O. Zolesi
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Maremmani
    • 1
  1. 1.Dependence-Psychiatry Unit, Psychiatric InstituteUniversity of PisaItaly
  2. 2.Ph.D. Research Program SienaPisa & Cagliari UniversitiesItaly

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