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Revision Joint Replacement: Proximal Femoral Replacement

  • Michael G. Rock

Abstract

One of the more difficult problems encountered by orthopedic surgeons today is periarticular loss of bone as a result of aseptic loosening in the multi-revised arthroplasty patient, massive osteolysis in response to debris accumulation from the articulating components, stress shielding, fracture, infection or even iatrogenic damage. Such bone loss precludes the use of conventional arthroplasty components due to the lack of mechanical support. Femoral revisions relying on extensive cementation have failed prematurely [5,22,28]. It has become apparent that revision hip arthroplasty performed in the presence of poor quality bone will fail with further aseptic loosening, stem breakage, femoral fracture, or femoral subsidence. The importance of reconstituting quality bone to the revision arthroplasty patient is assuming greater significance in light of the lack of clinical success when performing such operations in patients with compromised or deficient bone.

Keywords

Proximal Femur Strut Allograft Extended Trochanteric Osteotomy Cortical Strut Proximal Femoral Replacement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael G. Rock
    • 1
  1. 1.Orthopaedic DepartmentMayo Clinic and Mayo FoundationRochesterUSA

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