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Psychoimmunology, anxiety disorders and TMJ-disorders

  • G. Langs
  • G. Herzog
  • K. Penkner
  • U. Demel
  • G. Tilz
  • R. O. Bratschko
  • G. Wieselmann
Conference paper
Part of the Key Topics in Brain Research book series (KEYTOPICS)

Abstract

Stress and anxiety and their relationship to temporo-mandibular-joint (TMJ)-dysfunction pain syndrome has been subject to much research and controversy in recent years. According to Solberg et al. (1981) stress and anxiety lead to an increase of muscle tension in temporo-mandibular muscles. This physiological reaction can result in temporo-mandibu- lar joint pain and dysfunction like occlusional dysfunction, displacement of the disc, bruxism and athrosis (Curran et al, 1996; Jäger et al, 1987; Oakley et al, 1993; Ramfjord, 1961). Therefore stress and anxiety deserve emphasis as a significant underlying cause of TMJ-dysfunction, which has been investigated by a number of studies. Many of them evaluated connections between psychological tests or psychiatric rating scales (e.g. MMPI, Hopkins Symptoms Check List, etc.) on one side, TMJ disorders on the other (Carlson et al, 1993; Stockstill and Callahan, 1991).

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Mitral Valve Prolapse Temporomandibular Disorder Psychiatric Rating Scale Immunological Alteration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Langs
    • 1
  • G. Herzog
    • 1
  • K. Penkner
    • 2
  • U. Demel
    • 3
  • G. Tilz
    • 3
  • R. O. Bratschko
    • 2
  • G. Wieselmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity HospitalGrazAustria
  2. 2.Department of Prosthetic DentistryUniversity HospitalGrazAustria
  3. 3.Department of ImmunologyUniversity HospitalGrazAustria

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