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Use of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and dot-blot hybridisation for the detection and identification of African horse sickness virus nucleic acids

  • S. Zientara
  • C. Sailleau
  • S. Moulay
  • C. Crucière
  • M. El-Harrak
  • W. W. Laegreid
  • C. Hamblin
Conference paper

Summary

A coupled reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR) for the detection of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) dsRNA, has been developed using genome segment 7 as the target template for primers. RNA from isolates of all nine AHSV serotypes were readily detected. The potential inhibitory effects of either ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) or heparin on the RT-PCR were eliminated by washing blood samples before lysis of the red blood cells and storage. There was a close agreement in the sensitivity and the specificity of the RT-PCR and an indirect sandwich ELISA. Confirmation of the presence of AHSV using RT-PCR and dot-blot hybridization on blood samples collected from horses experimentally infected with AHSV serotype 4 (AHSV 4) and AHSV serotype 9 (AHSV 9), was achieved within 24 hours, compared to the period of several days required for virus isolation. The RT-PCR and virus isolation methods showed similar levels of sensitivity when used for the detection of AHSV in 3 horses infected with AHSV 4, and in 2 out of 3 horses infected with a less virulent isolate of AHSV 9. Although viraemia was detected in the third horse by virus isolation, from 6 to 14 days after infection, this animal remained consistently negative by RT-PCR. Conversely, AHSV viral RNA was detected by RT-PCR in the blood of 4 donkeys and 4 mules up to 55 days after their experimental infection despite the absence of any detectable infectious virus. RT-PCR is a sensitive and rapid method for detecting AHSV nucleic acids during either the incubation period at the start of an African horse sickness (AHS) epizootic, or for epidemiological investigations in species where clinical signs may be inapparent.

Keywords

Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid Virus Isolation Genome Segment Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Zientara
    • 1
  • C. Sailleau
    • 2
  • S. Moulay
    • 2
  • C. Crucière
    • 2
  • M. El-Harrak
    • 3
  • W. W. Laegreid
    • 4
  • C. Hamblin
    • 5
  1. 1.Laboratoire Central de Recherches VeterinairesCentre National d’Etudes Veterinaires et AlimentairesMaisons-Alfort CedexFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire Central de Recherches VeterinairesCentre National d’Etudes Veterinaires et AlimentairesMaisons-AlfortFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire BiopharmaRabat-AkkariMorocco
  4. 4.Animal Health SystemsUSDA, ARS, Meat Animal Research CenterClay CenterUSA
  5. 5.Pirbright LaboratoryInstitute For Animal HealthWoking, SurreyUK

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