Advertisement

Haptic Interactions in the Real and Virtual Worlds

  • M. A. Srinivasan
  • C. Basdogan
  • C.-H. Ho
Conference paper
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

In humans or machines, haptics refers to the use of hands for manual sensing and manipulation. Recently, haptic machines that enable the user to touch, feel, and manipulate virtual environments have generated considerable excitement. Synthesizing virtual haptic objects requires an optimal balance between the human haptic ability to sense object properties, computational complexity to render them in real time, and fidelity of the device in delivering the computed mechanical signals. In this paper, we primarily describe the progress made in our “MIT Touch Lab” over the past few years concerning the development of haptic machines, the paradigms and algorithms used in the emerging field of “Computer Haptics” (analogous to Computer Graphics), and experimental results on human perception and performance in multimodal virtual environments. Several ongoing applications such as the development of a surgical simulator and virtual environments shared by multiple users are also described.

Keywords

Virtual Environment Force Feedback Virtual Object Haptic Feedback Haptic Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Srinivasan, M A, Haptic Interfaces, In Virtual Reality: Scientific and Technical Challenges Eds: N. I. Durlach and A. S. Mayor, Report of the Committee on Virtual Reality Research and Development, National Research Council, National Academy Press, 1995.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Srinivasan, M A and Basdogan, C, Haptics in Virtual Environments: Taxonomy, Research Status, and Challenges, Computers and Graphics, Vol. 21, No. 4, 1997.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Massie, T H and Salisbury, J K, The PHANToM Haptic Interface: A Device for Probing Virtual Objects. Proceedings of the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division, Vol. 55(1), pp. 295–301, 1997.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Salisbury, J K and Srinivasan, M A, Phantom-Based Haptic Interaction with Virtual Objects, IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, Vol. 17, No. 5, 1997.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Ho, C-H, Basdogan, C and Srinivasan, M A, Haptic Rendering: Point-and Ray-based Interactions, Proceedings of the Second PHANToM User’s Group Workshop, October, 1997.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Ho, C-H, Basdogan, C and Srinivasan, M A, Efficient Point-based Rendering Techniques for Haptic Display of Virtual Objects, Presence, 1999 (in press).Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Basdogan, C, Ho, C-H and Srinivasan M A, A Ray-based Haptic Rendering Technique for Displaying Shape and Texture of 3D Objects in Virtual Environments, Proceedings of the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division, Ed. G. Rizzoni, DSC-Vol. 61, pp. 77–84, ASME, 1997.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Morgenbesser, H B and Srinivasan, M A, Force Shading for Haptic Shape Perception, Proceedings of the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division, DSC­Vol. 58, pp. 407–412, ASME, 1996.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    DiFranco, D E, Beauregard, G L and Srinivasan, M A, The Effect of Auditory Cues on the Haptic Perception of Stiffness in Virtual Environments, Proceedings of the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division, Ed. G. Rizzoni, DSC-Vol. 61, pp. 17–22, ASME, 1997.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Srinivasan, M A, Beauregard, G L and Brock, D L, The Impact of Visual Information on Haptic Perception of Stiffness in Virtual Environments, Proceedings of the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division, DSC-Vol. 58, pp. 555–559, ASME, 1996.Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    Wu, W-C, Basdogan, C and Srinivasan, M A, Effect of Visual Perspective on the Visual and Haptic Perception of Size and Stiffness in Virtual Environments, Proceedings of the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division, 1999 (in press).Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Basdogan, C, Ho, C-H, Srinivasan, M A, Small, S D and Dawson, S L, Force Interactions in Laparoscopic Simulations: Haptic Rendering of Soft Tissues, Proceedings of the Medicine Meets Virtual Reality (MMVR’98) VI Conference, San Diego, CA, pp. 385–391, January, 1998.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    De, S and Srinivasan, M A, Thin Walled Models for Haptic and Graphical Rendering of Soft Tissues in Surgical Simulations, Proceedings of Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference 7, San Francisco, CA., January, 1999.Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    Basdogan, C, Ho, C-H and Srinivasan, M A, Simulation of Tissue Cutting and Bleeding for Laparoscopic Surgery Using Auxiliary Surfaces, Proceedings of Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference 7, San Francisco, CA., January, 1999.Google Scholar
  15. [15]
    Ho, C-H, Basdogan, C, Slater, M, Durlach, M, and Srinivasan, M A, The Influence of Haptic Communication on the Sense of Being Together, Workshop on Presence in Shared Virtual Environments, BT Labs, Ipswich, UK, June, 1998.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Srinivasan
    • 1
  • C. Basdogan
    • 1
  • C.-H. Ho
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Human and Machine HapticsMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

Personalised recommendations