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Interactive Direct Volume Rendering of Time-Varying Data

  • John Clyne
  • John M. Dennis
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

Previous efforts aimed at improving direct volume rendering performance have focused largely on time-invariant, 3D data. Little work has been done in the area of interactive direct volume rendering of time-varying data, such as is commonly found in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Until recently, the additional costs imposed by time-varying data have made consideration of interactive direct volume rendering impractical. We present a volume rendering system based on a parallel implementation of the Shear-Warp Factorization algorithm that is capable of rendering time-varying 1283 data at interactive speeds.

Keywords

Computational Fluid Dynamics Lookup Table Volume Rendering Polar Vortex Direct Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Clyne
    • 1
  • John M. Dennis
    • 1
  1. 1.Scientific Computing DivisionNational Center for Atmospheric ResearchEngland

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