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The Interaction Between Individuals’ Immersive Tendencies and the Sensation of Presence in a Virtual Environment

  • Cathryn Johns
  • David Nuñez
  • Marc Daya
  • Duncan Sellars
  • Juan Casanueva
  • Edwin Blake
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

Witmer and Singer have developed a questionnaire for presence (PQ) as well as an immersive tendencies questionnaire (ITQ). Their research has shown that ITQ scores are positively correlated with PQ scores. This paper reports on an attempt to replicate these findings in a non-immersive, collaborative setting, by creating one virtual environment designed to engender a high sense of presence in users, and one designed to disrupt and decrease the sense of presence felt by users. The major findings of this attempt were firstly that while there was a difference in the two worlds according to the definition of presence, the PQ did not pick up this difference, and secondly that PQ scores were correlated with ITQ scores only in the so-called “high-presence” environment, implying that Witmer and Singer’s results hold only under certain conditions.

Keywords

Virtual Reality Virtual Environment Instruction Sheet Collaborative Virtual Environment Collaborative Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathryn Johns
    • 1
  • David Nuñez
    • 1
  • Marc Daya
    • 1
  • Duncan Sellars
    • 1
  • Juan Casanueva
    • 1
  • Edwin Blake
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science, University of Cape TownCollaborative Visual Computing LaboratoryRondeboschSouth Africa

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