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Direct Volume Rendering from Photographic Data

  • David Ebert
  • Tim McClanahan
  • Penny Rheingans
  • Terry Yoo
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

Direct volume rendering from photographic volume data has the potential to create realistic images of internal volume structure, as well as the structure of boundaries within the volume. While possession of the photographic volume simplifies color calculations in voxel illumination, it complicates opacity calculation. This paper describes a framework for addressing illumination challenges in photographic volume data and presents initial results.

Keywords

Color Space Volume Rendering Bidirectional Reflection Distribution Function Volume Visualization Direct Volume Rendering 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Ebert
    • 1
  • Tim McClanahan
    • 2
  • Penny Rheingans
    • 1
  • Terry Yoo
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and Electrical EngineeringUniversity of MarylandBaltimore CountyUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory for Extraterrestrial PhysicsNASA Goddard Space Flight CenterUSA
  3. 3.Office of High Performance Computing and CommunicationNational Library of MedicineUSA

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