Advertisement

Stem cell marker expression in human trisomy 21 amniotic fluid cells and trophoblasts

  • A.-R. Prusa
  • E. Marton
  • M. Rosner
  • A. Freilinger
  • G. Bernaschek
  • M. Hengstschläger
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission Supplement 67 book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 67)

Summary

Down Syndrome is the most frequent genetic cause of mental retardation. Deregulation of specific differentiation processes is a major cause for the neuropathological cell features typical for this syndrome. The molecular mechanisms leading to Down Syndrome are likely to be operative from the very earliest time of embryonic/fetal development. We therefore analysed human amniotic fluid cell samples and cytotrophoblastic cells from placental biopsies, both with normal karyotypes and with trisomy 21, for the mRNA expression of stem cell marker genes. Here we describe for the first time that these human primary cell sources contain cells that express telomerase reverse transcriptase, leukemia inhibitory factor receptor, and bone morphogenetic protein receptor II. A specific difference between aneuploid and normal cells could not be detected. These data provide evidence that human amniotic fluid and cytotrophoblastic cell cultures might provide a new source for research on primary cell systems expressing these stem cell markers. In addition, it is suggested that early deregulation of the expression of these genes in the here analysed cell sources does not contribute to the molecular development of Down Syndrome.

Keywords

Down Syndrome Amniotic Fluid Stem Cell Marker Cytotrophoblastic Cell Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Antonarakis SE, Avramopoulos D, Blouin JL, Talbot CC, Schinzel AA (1993) Mitotic errors in somatic cells cause trisomy 21 in about 4.5% of cases and are not associated with advanced maternal age. Nat Genet 3: 146–150PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bahn S, Mimmack M, Ryan M, Caldwell MA, Jauniaux E, Starkey M, Svendsen CN, Emson P (2002) Neuronal target genes of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor in neurospheres derived from fetuses with Down’s syndrome: a gene expression study. Lancet 359: 310–315PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Benn PA (2002) Advances in prenatal screening for Down syndrome: II first trimester testing, integrated testing, and future directions. Clin Chim Acta 324 (1–2): 1–11PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Burdon T, Smith A, Savatier P (2002) Signalling, cell cycle and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Trends Cell Biol 12 (9): 432–438PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cairns NJ (1999) Neuropathology. J Neural Transm [Suppl] 57: 61–74Google Scholar
  6. Ebendal T, Bengtsson H, Soderstrom S (1998) Bone morphogenetic proteins and their receptors: potential functions in the brain. J Neurosci Res 51: 139–146PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Engidawork E, Lubec G (2003) Molecular changes in fetal Down syndrome brain. J Neurochem 84: 895–904PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gosden CM (1983) Amniotic fluid cell types and culture. Br Med Bull 39: 348–354PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Hernandez D, Fisher EM (1996) Down syndrome genetics: unravelling a multifactorial disorder. Hum Mol Genet 5: 1411–1416PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Hoehn H, Salk D (1982) Morphological and biochemical heterogeneity of amniotic fluid cells in culture. Meth Cell Biol 26: 11–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Kakishita K, Elwan MA, Nakao N, Itakura T, Sakuragawa N (2000) Human amniotic epithelial cells produce dopamine and survive after implantation into the striatum of a rat model of Parkinson’s disease: a potential source of donor for transplantation therapy. Exp Neurol 165: 27–34PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Kaviani A, Perry TE, Dzakovic A, Jennings RW, Ziegler MM, Fauza DO (2001) The amniotic fluid as a source of cells for fetal tissue engineering. J Pediatr Surg 36: 1662–1665PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Lubec G, Engidawork E (2002) The brain in Down syndrome (TRISOMY 21). J Neurol 249: 1347–1356PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Miller RJ (2002) The ups and downs of Down’s syndrome. Lancet 359: 275–276PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Milunsky A (1979) Amniotic fluid cell culture. In: Milunsky A (ed) Genetic disorder and the fetus. Plenum Press, New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Mosquera A, Fernandez JL, Campos A, Goyanes VJ, Ramiro-Diaz J, Gosalvez J (1999) Simultaneous decrease of telomere length and telomerase activity with ageing of human amniotic fluid cells. J Med Genet 36: 494–496PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Niwa H (2001) Molecular mechanism to maintain stem cell renewal of ES cells. Cell Struct Funct 26 (3): 137–148PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Prusa A-R, Hengstschläger M (2002) Amniotic fluid cells and human stem cell research — a new connection. Med Sci Monit 8: 253–257Google Scholar
  19. Ruiz-Canela M (2002) Embryonic stem cell research: the relevance of ethics in the progress of science. Med Sci Monit 8: SR21–26Google Scholar
  20. Sakuragawa N, Thangavel R, Mizuguchi M, Hirasawa M, Kamo I (1996) Expression of markers for both neuronal and glial cells in human amniotic epithelial cells. Neurosci Lett 209: 9–12PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Sandler TW (1995) Langman’s medical embryology. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, pp 71–80Google Scholar
  22. Wegner R-D (1999) Diagnostic cytogenetics. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York TokyoGoogle Scholar
  23. Weissman IL (2000) Stem cells: units of development, units of regeneration, and units in evolution. Cell 100: 157–168PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Xu C, Inokuma MS, Denham J, Golds K, Kundu P, Gold JD, Carpenter MK (2001) Feeder-free growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells. Nat Biotechnol 19 (10): 971–974PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Yoon PW, Freeman SB, Sherman SL, Taft LF, Gu Y, Pettay D, Flanders WD, Khoury MJ, Hassold TJ (1996) Advanced maternal age and the risk of Down syndrome characterized by the meiotic stage of the chromosomal error: a population-based study. Am J Hum Genet 58: 628–633PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • A.-R. Prusa
    • 1
  • E. Marton
    • 1
  • M. Rosner
    • 1
  • A. Freilinger
    • 1
  • G. Bernaschek
    • 1
  • M. Hengstschläger
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Obstetrics and Gynecology, Prenatal Diagnosis and TherapyUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.Obstetrics and Gynecology, Prenatal Diagnosis and TherapyUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria

Personalised recommendations