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Neuroanatomical bases of spasticity

  • D. Jeanmonod

Abstract

A detailed clinical analysis of spastic conditions shows that spasticity is not one homogeneous phenomenon. There are multiple clinical presentations of it, in particular: 1) in its selective distribution over different muscle groups in a given limb, 2) in its selective response to various natural stimuli, 3) in its time course characteristics, with the absence, but more often with the presence, of a spasticity-free interval of a few months after the lesion, and 4) in the location of the causative lesion(s). These lesions have been seen in regions as widely spread and diverse as the central and premotor cortices or their cortico-spinal fibres, the brain stem motor centres or their descending pathways, and the spinal cord.

Keywords

Dorsal Root Entry Zone Dorsal Funiculus Dorsal Column Nucleus Lamina Versus Nucleus Ventralis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Jeanmonod
    • 1
  1. 1.Labor für funktionelle Neurochirurgie, Neurochirurgische KlinikUniversitätsspital ZürichZürichSwitzerland

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