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Wind tunnel observations of aeolian transport rates

  • K. R. Rasmussen
  • H. E. Mikkelsen
Part of the Acta Mechanica Supplementum book series (ACTA MECH.SUPP., volume 1)

Summary

We have studied some of the causes of the discrepancies between the transport rate formulae published in the literature. The slow development of the equilibrium boundary layer over a rough bed with saltation may bias the wind gradient measurements, especially in short wind tunnels. Other discrepancies may be due to transient transport conditions caused by changes in bed texture and grain size composition. Wind profile data show that the aerodynamic roughness length z 0 = 0.022 u * 2/2g, in which u * is the friction velocity and g is the gravity constant. This agrees well with earlier findings, and the equation could be an important tool in validating wind tunnel data. Transport rate data from the Aarhus wind tunnel differ significantly from the Lettau and Bagnold equations, but agree well with predictions from a new analytical model.

Keywords

Wind Tunnel Transport Rate Friction Velocity Wind Profile Sand Transport 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. R. Rasmussen
    • 1
  • H. E. Mikkelsen
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of GeologyUniversity of AarhusAarhus CDenmark
  2. 2.Department of AgrometeorologyResearch Center FoulumTjeleDenmark

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