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The Use of Resistance Genes in Breeding Epidemiological Considerations

  • Martin S. Wolfe
  • Cesare Gessler
Part of the Plant Gene Research book series (GENE)

Abstract

Breeding for resistance should be the best single form of disease control, both from the ecological and economic points-of-view. However, the application of breeding for disease resistance depends on whether or not the crop in question is considered sufficiently valuable to support a breeding or selection programme, whether it is short- or long-cycled and whether the end product is consumed indirectly or directly. At one extreme are the annual cereals, the most valuable crops in the world, which have short cycles allowing several breeding generations per year and which are used indirectly, so that some degree of damage to the crop can be tolerated. With these crops, breeding for resistance often occupies more than half of the resources of breeding programmes.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Leaf Rust Stem Rust Apple Cultivar Durable Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin S. Wolfe
    • 1
  • Cesare Gessler
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Plant SciencesSwiss Federal Institute of TechnologyZurichSwitzerland

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