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Neuroleptic-psychosocial interactions and prediction of outcome

  • I. D. Glick
Conference paper

Abstract

Over the past 3 decades, controlled studies have demonstrated the efficacy of psychotropic medications for most psychiatric disorders. Still for many patients and their families, the outcome is disappointing. A critical issue is how to increase the effectiveness of “effective” medication. In no other disorder is the challenge greater than in combining psychosocial interventions to improve neuroleptic treatment outcome for schizophrenia.

Keywords

Mood Disorder Family Intervention Collaborative Study Group Neuroleptic Medication Hosp Commun Psychiatry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. D. Glick
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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