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A Nonmonotonic Extension to Horn-Clause Logic

  • Thomas J. Weigert
Part of the Texts and Monographs in Symbolic Computation book series (TEXTSMONOGR)

Abstract

Standard first-order logic, and therefore, any description of the world that relies on it, ordinarily requires the absence of contradiction. It has been repeatedly pointed out that in describing the real world it is often very difficult to avoid making contradictory statements (e.g., when realizing that an assumption had proven wrong, we might have to assert the denial of what we had assumed to hold true). The example that has become a classic in the AI literature is the problem that Birds fly, Penguins are birds, but Penguins don’t fly.

Keywords

Logic Program Logic Programming Predicate Symbol Ground Atom Nonmonotonic Reasoning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Wien 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Weigert

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