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Human Mummies pp 279-281 | Cite as

Comparison of the lipid profile of the Tyrolean Iceman with bodies recovered from glaciers

  • A. Makristathis
  • R. Mader
  • K. Varmuza
  • I. Simonitsch
  • J. Schwarzmeier
  • H. Seidler
  • W. Platzer
  • H. Unterndorfer
  • R. Scheithauer
Part of the The Man in the Ice book series (3262, volume 3)

Abstract

In September 1991, an approximately 5000 year-old frozen mummy of a man was found in the Tyrolean Alps. The Tyrolean Iceman is a unique find, which has been the subject of several studies since then. Even from frozen anthropologic samples, decomposition of macromolecules is one of the major obstacles in the analysis of proteins or nucleic acids (1, 2). Small molecules present at high concentrations in tissue, such as fatty acids, should have a better chance to evade the decomposition process. We therefore analyzed the lipid profile of samples from the skin, trabecular bone, nose cavity and paranasal sinus of the tyrolean ice man and other human corpses, buried in glaciers (skin, muscle from calf and thigh, cardial muscle, lung, liver, bone marrow), by gas-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The lipid profile of these samples was compared with the corresponding tissue samples from fresh human corpses. Additionally, three tissue samples from a well preserved female body, recovered from a lake after 50 years, could be analyzed.

Keywords

Lipid Profile Trabecular Bone Hydroxy Acid Methyl Silicone Phenyl Methyl Silicone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Makristathis
    • 1
  • R. Mader
    • 2
  • K. Varmuza
    • 3
  • I. Simonitsch
    • 4
  • J. Schwarzmeier
    • 2
  • H. Seidler
    • 5
  • W. Platzer
    • 6
  • H. Unterndorfer
    • 7
  • R. Scheithauer
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hygiene InstituteUniversity of ViennaAustria
  2. 2.Department of Internal Medicine I and L. Boltzmann Institute for Cytokine ResearchUniversity of ViennaAustria
  3. 3.Institute of General ChemistryTechnical University of ViennaAustria
  4. 4.Department of Clinical PathologyUniversity of ViennaAustria
  5. 5.Institute of Human BiologyUniversity of ViennaAustria
  6. 6.Institute of AnatomyUniversity of InnsbruckAustria
  7. 7.Institute of Forensic MedicineUniversity of InnsbruckAustria

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