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Introduction

  • Shozo Urasawa
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Virology book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 12)

Abstract

At the beginning of this special issue on viral gastroenteritis, a brief introduction on the viruses concerned may help readers better understand the papers that follow. In this international symposium, viruses from families causing gastroenteritis in humans, rotaviruses (Reoviridae), caliciviruses (Caliciviridae), astroviruses (Astroviridae) and adenoviruses (Adenoviridae), were highlighted. Some basic characters and epidemiologic features of these viruses are summarized in Table 1, and structural features are illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.

Keywords

Gastroenteritis Virus Norwalk Virus Field Virology Enteric Adenovirus Human Caliciviruses 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shozo Urasawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HygieneSapporo Medical University School of MedicineChuoku, Sapporo 060Japan

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