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Indexes in sums and series: from formal definition to object-oriented implementation

  • O. Caprotti
Part of the Texts and Monographs in Symbolic Computation book series (TEXTSMONOGR)

Abstract

Applicative mathematics is done with indexes. Physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences yield a wide range of applications where expressions containing indexes are used for formalizing and computing. Nevertheless, the available computer algebra systems often show little skill in dealing with expressions that contain indexes. Typical problems include: incorrect notion of variable binding and lack of knowledge about the domains over which the variables range. Wang (1990) and Cioni and Miola (1990) pointed out these deficiencies. In this paper, we show how the object-oriented design methodology proposed by the TASSO project can be applied successfully to this case.

Keywords

Computer Algebra System Symbolic Manipulation Abstract Data Type Symbolic Object Algebraic Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Caprotti

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