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A general reasoning apparatus for intelligent tutoring systems in mathematics

  • A. Colagrossi
  • A. Micarelli
Part of the Texts and Monographs in Symbolic Computation book series (TEXTSMONOGR)

Abstract

Since the early sixties the use of computers in education (computer aided instruction, CAI) has aimed to individualize instruction, i.e., tailor study procedures to the needs and characteristics of the individual student. However, although some progress has been made, CAI is still a long way off from achieving this goal. In practice, with CAI systems the student has a passive role, being exposed to a fixed set of problems that have been stored together with a corresponding set of pre-canned solutions. The tutoring path is rigid, with one-way teaching interaction only and with very little individualization. The possibility to get over the limits of the traditional CAI came from studies on cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence, with particular attention paid to the interaction between teacher and student. These researches led to the development of new educational systems, called intelligent computer aided instruction (ICAI) systems or intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), where artificial intelligence techniques are largely applied.

Keywords

Inference Rule Tutoring System Sequent Calculus Student Model Reasoning Procedure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Colagrossi
  • A. Micarelli

There are no affiliations available

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