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Endogenous monoamine oxidase A inhibitory activity (tribulin), measured in saliva, is related to cardiovascular reactivity in normal individuals

  • A. Clow
  • A. Doyle
  • F. Hucklebridge
  • D. Carroll
  • C. Ring
  • J. Shrimpton
  • G. Willemsen
  • P. D. Evans
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission. Supplement book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 52)

Summary

Salivary monoamine oxidase A inhibitory activity (MAO-AI), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were determined simultaneously in healthy male students (n = 13) at rest, before a mild psychological stressor, twice during the task and 18 minutes after the end of the task. The sample as a whole showed significant differences in MAP and HR across occasions (respectively, p < 0.001 for both). Salivary MAO-AI could distinguish novice and experienced game players (p < 0.02) and was consistently positively correlated with MAP (r = 0.58, p < 0.05 on occasion 2). Pre-task measures of MAO-AI for an increased sample (n = 18) were associated with higher MAP (but not HR) throughout the experiment (p < 0.05). Those subjects with falling MAO-AI profiles from task to recovery showed significantly greater simultaneous decline in HR than those with a rising MAO-AI profile (p < 0.05).

Keywords

Monoamine Oxidase Mean Arterial Pressure Cardiovascular Reactivity Experienced Player 100mM Sodium Phosphate Buffer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Clow
    • 1
    • 3
  • A. Doyle
    • 1
  • F. Hucklebridge
    • 1
  • D. Carroll
    • 2
  • C. Ring
    • 2
  • J. Shrimpton
    • 2
  • G. Willemsen
    • 2
  • P. D. Evans
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychophysiology and Stress Research GroupUniversity of WestminsterLondonUK
  2. 2.School of Sport and Exercise SciencesUniversity of BirminghamUK
  3. 3.Psychophysiology and Stress research Group, Division of PhysiologyUniversity of WestminsterLondonUK

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