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Neuroprotection by selegiline and other MAO inhibitors

  • G. Stern
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission. Supplement book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 52)

Summary

A proposal for the nomination of the father of monoamine oxidase inhibitors is presented. A brief history of the human clinical pharmacology of selegiline is considered including the results of two major prospective ongoing clinical trials and recent evidence on the effects of sustained selegiline therapy on postural blood pressures in parkinsonians is discussed.

Keywords

Postural Hypotension Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Mortality Figure Parkinson Study Group Postural Dizziness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Stern
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeurologyUniversity College, London HospitalsUK

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