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A cell culture model of cerebral ischemia as a convenient system to screen for neuroprotective drugs

  • J. Ekblom
  • H. Garpenstrand
  • O. Tottmar
  • J. A. Prince
  • L. Oreland
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission. Supplement book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 52)

Summary

Aggregation cultures of rat brain were exposed to a combination of anoxia and hypoglycaemia for 30 minutes. Thereafter, the release of lactate dehydrogenase into the cell culture medium was monitored up to 4 days as a measure of cell damage after the ischemic insult. Some cultures were treated with different concentrations of deprenyl or tolcapone, selective inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B and catechol-O-methyltransferase, respectively. After 1 day in culture, the release of lactate dehydrogenase was significantly reduced in cultures treated with deprenyl (at 1 nM, 100nM, and 10 μM), as well as in cultures treated with 1nM or 100nM tolcapone; 10μM of tolcapone, on the other hand, resulted in a toxic effect on the cell aggregates. No differences in the release of lactate dehydrogenase into the medium was observed in the aggregates treated with drugs as compared with the control cultures after 2 or 4 days post-ischemia.

Keywords

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Cerebral Ischemia Ischemic Insult Neuroprotective Drug Medical Pharmacology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Ekblom
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Garpenstrand
    • 1
  • O. Tottmar
    • 1
  • J. A. Prince
    • 1
  • L. Oreland
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Animal PhysiologyUppsala University, Biomedical CenterUppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Department of Medical PharmacologyUppsala University, Biomedical CenterUppsalaSweden

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