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Classification of 3-D Dendritic Spines using Self-Organizing Maps

  • G. Sommerkorn
  • U. Seiffert
  • D. Surmeli
  • A. Herzog
  • B. Michaelis
  • K. Braun
Conference paper

Abstract

This work in progress shows a method for classifying dendritic spines by their shape. Focal points are the extraction of features from three-dimensional spine data and the following classification of the spines. Hence there will be only little reflection of biological aspects of this problem. Feature extraction based on moments and spherical coordinates will be discussed. Furthermore, this paper shows and describes a modified kind of self organizing maps (SOM)), which is used for the classification of the dendritic spines.

Keywords

Dendritic Spine Spine Axis Domestic Chick Geometric Moment Spine Shape 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Sommerkorn
    • 1
  • U. Seiffert
    • 1
  • D. Surmeli
    • 1
  • A. Herzog
    • 1
  • B. Michaelis
    • 1
  • K. Braun
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Measurement Technology and ElectronicsOtto-von-Guericke University of MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  2. 2.Federal Institute for Neurobiology MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany

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