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Apolipoprotein E genotype, atherosclerosis, and cognitive decline: the Rotterdam study

  • A. J. C. Slooter
  • C. M. van Duijn
  • M. L. Bots
  • A. Ott
  • M. B. Breteler
  • J. De Voecht
  • A. Wehnert
  • P. de Knijff
  • L. M. Havekes
  • D. E. Grobbee
  • C. Van Broeckhoven
  • A. Hofman
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission. Supplementa book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 53)

Summary

The apolipoprotein E4 allele (APOEɛ4) and atherosclerosis are risk factors for cognitive decline. We investigated whether the effects of APOEɛ4 and atherosclerosis on cognitive decline are independent. A population-based follow-up study was performed on 838 subjects who were non-demented at baseline. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score at follow-up was studied as a function of APOEɛ4 and atherosclerosis. Mild, non-significant effects on the MMSE score were found for atherosclerosis in the absence of APOEɛ4 and for APOEɛ4 in the absence of atherosclerosis. APOEɛ4 carriers with two or more indicators of atherosclerosis positive, had a significantly lower MMSE score at follow-up (mean difference −0.7 points; 95% confidence interval −1.1 to −0.2) relative to non-APOEɛ4 carriers with no evidence of atherosclerosis. Our findings suggest that the consequences of APOEɛ4 and atherosclerosis are not independent, and that particularly APOEɛ4 carriers with atherosclerosis are at increased risk of cognitive decline.

Keywords

Cognitive Decline Common Carotid Artery APOE Genotype Mini Mental State Examination Score Rotterdam Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. C. Slooter
    • 1
  • C. M. van Duijn
    • 1
  • M. L. Bots
    • 1
  • A. Ott
    • 1
  • M. B. Breteler
    • 1
  • J. De Voecht
    • 2
  • A. Wehnert
    • 2
  • P. de Knijff
    • 3
    • 4
  • L. M. Havekes
    • 3
  • D. E. Grobbee
    • 1
  • C. Van Broeckhoven
    • 2
  • A. Hofman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsErasmus University Medical SchoolRotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Neurogenetics Laboratory, Flemish Institute of BiotechnologyBorn-Bunge Foundation, University of Antwerp (UIA)AntwerpBelgium
  3. 3.TNO Prevention and HealthGaubius LaboratoryLeidenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.MGC Department of Human GeneticsLeiden UniversityLeidenThe Netherlands

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