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Successful pedagogical applications of symbolic computation

  • Raymond Ravaglia
  • Theodore Alper
  • Marianna Rozenfeld
  • Patrick Suppes
Part of the Texts and Monographs in Symbolic Computation book series (TEXTSMONOGR)

Abstract

At the Education Program for Gifted Youth (EPGY) we have developed a series of stand-alone, multi-media computer-based courses designed to teach advanced students mathematics at the secondary-school and college level. The EPGY course software has been designed to be used in those settings where a regular class cannot be offered, either because of an insufficient number of students to take the course or the absence of a qualified instructor to teach the course. In this way it differs from traditional applications of computers in education, most of which are intended to be used primarily as supplements and in conjunction with a human teacher.

Keywords

Correct Answer Inference Rule Symbolic Computation Computer Algebra System Intelligent Tutoring System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond Ravaglia
  • Theodore Alper
  • Marianna Rozenfeld
  • Patrick Suppes

There are no affiliations available

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