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The ACELA project: aims and plans

  • Arjeh M. Cohen
  • Lambert Meertens
Part of the Texts and Monographs in Symbolic Computation book series (TEXTSMONOGR)

Abstract

The most visible aim of the ACELA (architecture of a computer environment for Lie algebras) project is the production of a state-of-the-art interactive book on Lie algebras; state-of-the-art mathematically as well as in its interactive potential. While we have chosen this as a worthwhile and challenging goal by itself, this target also serves as a concrete milestone for our longer-term aims, offering a realistic and far from trivial testing ground for our ideas.

Keywords

Mathematical Object Computer Algebra Computer Algebra System Young Tableau Kernel System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arjeh M. Cohen
  • Lambert Meertens

There are no affiliations available

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