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Underresearched Tropical Food Crops: Cowpea, Banana and Plantain, and Yams

  • Robert Asiedu
  • Christian A. Fatokun
  • Jacob H. D. Mignouna
  • S. Yong C. Ng
  • F. Margaret Quin
  • Dirk R. Vuylsteke
Part of the Plant Gene Research book series (GENE)

Abstract

For a mixture of reasons certain tropical crops which are important as primary or secondary food staples are relatively underresearched. The modem tools of molecular and cellular biotechnology offer the opportunity not only to make substantial gains in our knowledge of these crops, but also to overcome some of the obstacles which presently restrain both their genetic improvement and their productivity in tropical farming Systems. The crops considered here, cowpea (Vigna unguiculatd), banana and plantain (Musa spp.), and yams (Dioscorea spp.), typify this complex situation of importance combined with historical neglect.

Keywords

Randomly Amplify Polymorphic DNAs Amplify Fragment Length Polymorphism Plant Cell Tissue Organ Cult Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Vigna Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Asiedu
  • Christian A. Fatokun
  • Jacob H. D. Mignouna
  • S. Yong C. Ng
  • F. Margaret Quin
  • Dirk R. Vuylsteke

There are no affiliations available

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