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The Contribution of Genetic Engineering to the Fight against Hunger in Developing Countries

  • Klaus M. Leisinger
Part of the Plant Gene Research book series (GENE)

Abstract

The political, economic, and social world has changed significantly over the last 25 years. While the key indicators of human development have improved more in the past four decades than any time before in human history (UNDP, 1997), food security remains an unfulfilled dream today for more than 800 million people in developing countries (see Table 1).

Keywords

Food Security Genetic Engineering Food Insecurity Green Revolution National Agricultural Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus M. Leisinger

There are no affiliations available

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