Advertisement

Immunological alterations in patients suffering from bulimia nervosa (DSM-IV 307.51) vs anxiety disorders (DSM-IV 300.01, 300.21, 309.81, 300.02)

  • G. Wieselmann
  • G. Herzog
  • M. Schönauer-Cejpek
  • U. Demel
  • K. Penkner
  • G. Tilz
  • H. G. Zapotoczky
Conference paper
Part of the Key Topics in Brain Research book series (KEYTOPICS)

Summary

Alterations of the immunesystem in different kinds of psychiatric disorders are well known in literature in the last two decades. While there is a remarkable impact of these findings for patients suffering from “endogenous psychoses”, the role of the immunesystem in former called “neuroses” is still not clarified. Previous attempts to evaluate these ideas showed a relationship between anxiety disorders and alterations of the immunesystem. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the possible role of the immunesystem (cellular activity, humoral/polyclonal activation) in patients suffering from bulimia nervosa (DSM-IV 307.51) and to compare these data to those of sex and age matched anxiety disorder patients. The significance of immunological alterations in both groups of mental disorders was verified but the causes for these alterations remain unclear and need further research.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Anorexia Nervosa Binge Eating Bulimia Nervosa Routine Laboratory Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association (1994) DSM IV diagnostic and statistical manual for mental disorders, 4th ed. American Psychiatric Press, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  2. Langs G, Herzog G, Penkner K, Demel U, Tilz G, Bratschko RO, Wieselmann G (1997) Psychoimmunology, anxiety disorders and TMJ-disorders. In: Wieselmann G (ed) Current update in psychoimmunology. Springer, Wien New York, pp 79–83 (Key Topics in Brain Research)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Pomeroy C, Eckert E, Hu S, Eiken B, Mentink M, Crosby RD, Chao CC (1994) Role of interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-beta in anorexia nervosa. Biol Psychiatry 36: 836–839PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Stein M, Keller SE, Schleifer SJ (1988) Immunesystem: relationship to anxiety disorders. Psychiatr Clin North Am 11: 349–360PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Surmann OS, Williams J, Sheehan DV, Strom TB, Jones KJ, Coleman J (1986) Immunological response to stress in agoraphobia and panic attacks. Biol Psychiatry 21: 768–774CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Stunkard AJ, Messick S (1985) The three-factor eating questionnaire to measure dietary restraint, disinhibition and hunger. J Psych Res 29: 71–83CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Wieselmann G, Tilz G, Fabisch H, Herzog G, Langs G, Demel U, Zapotoczky HG (1997) Immunological factors in the sera of patients with acute and chronic schizophrenia. In: Henneberg AE, Kaschka WP (eds) Immunological alterations in psychiatric diseases. Karger, Basel, pp 85–89 (Adv Biol Psychiatry 18)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Wieselmann
    • 1
  • G. Herzog
    • 1
  • M. Schönauer-Cejpek
    • 1
  • U. Demel
    • 2
  • K. Penkner
    • 2
  • G. Tilz
    • 2
  • H. G. Zapotoczky
  1. 1.Departments of PsychiatryUniversity HospitalGrazAustria
  2. 2.Departments of Clinical ImmunologyUniversity HospitalGrazAustria

Personalised recommendations