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Data Management in Tourism: Chaotic and Quixotic

  • Joseph T. O’Leary

Abstract

Large quantities of data continue to be collected describing many facets of travel and tourism. These new data are layered on top of extensive collection efforts of the past causing claims of data overload and information and knowledge underload. Using travel demand data and examples from throughout the world, this paper discusses issues and problems encountered at various levels in utilizing data. Further, it points out alternative ways in which these data might be managed to create a knowledge management framework.

Keywords

Tacit Knowledge Explicit Knowledge Medium Tourism Tourism Management California Management Review 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph T. O’Leary
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Forestry and Natural ResourcesPurdue UniversityW.LafayetteUSA

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