Advertisement

Two-Handed Through-the-Lens-Techniques for Navigation in Virtual Environments

  • Stanislav L. Stoev
  • Dieter Schmalstieg
  • Wolfgang Straßer
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

We present a tool set of techniques for navigation in virtual environments. Based on a through-the-lens concept, the user is enabled to simultaneously view the surrounding virtual world and an arbitrary location of the virtual world as seen through an interactively defined window. For the manipulation and the adjustment of this virtual window we propose three different strategies, loosely based on the well-known eyeball-in-hand, scene-in-hand, and world-in-miniature techniques. Since our technique provides a preview area with controllable size and position, the occluded part of the scene can be flexibly managed, while enabling intuitive and precise work with the proposed tools. The proposed techniques provide powerful tools that are easy to implement and can be applied in any type of virtual environments.

Keywords

Virtual Environment Virtual World Virtual Camera Output Window Navigation Tool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    E. A. Bier, M. C. Stone, K. Pier, W. Buxton, and T. D. DeRose. Toolglass and magic lenses: The see-through interface. In SIGGRAPH 93 Conference Proceedings, volume 27, pages 73–80, 1993.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. Brooks, F. P. Grasping reality through illusion- interactive graphics serving science. In Proceedings of ACM CHI 88 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pages 1–11, 1988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    R. P. Darken and J. L. Sibert. A toolset for navigation in virtual environments. In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, Virtual Reality, pages 157–165, 1993.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. R. Mine, F. P. Brooks, Jr., and C. H. Séquin. Moving objects in space: Exploiting proprioception in virtual-environment interaction. In T. Whitted, editor, SIGGRAPH 97 Conference Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, pages 19–26. ACM SIGGRAPH, Addison Wesley, Aug. 1997. ISBN 0–89791–896–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    R. Pausch, T. Burnette, D. Brockway, and M. E. Weiblen. Navigation and locomotion in virtual worlds via flight into Hand-Held miniatures. In R. Cook, editor, SIGGRAPH 95 Conference Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, pages 399–400. ACM SIGGRAPH, Addison Wesley, Aug. 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J. S. Pierce, A. S. Forsberg, M. J. Conway, S. Hong, R. C. Zeleznik, and M. R. Mine. Image plane interaction techniques in 3D immersive environments. In M. Cohen and D. Zeltzer, editors, 1997 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, pages 39–44. ACM SIGGRAPH, Apr. 1997. ISBN 0-89791-884-3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    I. Poupyrev, M. Billinghurst, S. Weghorst, and T. Ichikawa. The go-go interaction technique: Non-linear mapping for direct manipulation in VR. In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, Papers: Virtual Reality (TechNote), pages 79–80, 1996.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    D. Schmalstieg, L. M. Encarnaçáo, and Z. Szalavári. Using transparent props for interaction with the virtual table (color plate S. 232). In S. N. Spencer, editor, Proceedings of the Conference on the 1999 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, pages 147–154, New York, Apr. 26–28 1999. ACM Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    D. Schmalstieg and G. Schaufler. Sewing worlds together with SEAMS: A mechanism to construct complex virtual environments. Presence — Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 8(4):449–461, Aug. 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    R. Stoakley, M. J. Conway, and R. Pausch. Virtual reality on a WIM: Interactive worlds in miniature. In Proceedings of ACM CHI’95 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pages 265–272, 1995.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Z. Szalavári and M. Gervautz. The personal interaction panel - A two handed interface for augmented reality. Computer Graphics Forum (Proceedings of EUROGRAPHICS’97), 16(3):335–346, 1997.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    A. van Dam, A. S. Forsberg, D. H. Laidlaw, J. J. LaViola, Jr., and R. M. Simpson. Immersive VR for scientific visualization: A progress report. IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 20(6):26–52, Nov./Dec. 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    J. Viega, M. J. Conway, G. Williams, and R. Pausch. 3D magic lenses. In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, Papers: Information Visualization, pages 51–58, 1996.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    C. Ware and S. Osborne. Exploration and virtual camera control in virtual three dimensional environments. In Proceedings of the 1990 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, Special Issue of Computer Graphics, Vol. 24, pages 175–183, 1990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanislav L. Stoev
    • 1
  • Dieter Schmalstieg
    • 2
  • Wolfgang Straßer
    • 1
  1. 1.WSI/GRISUniversity of TübingenTuebingenGermany
  2. 2.Vienna University of TechnologyViennaAustria

Personalised recommendations