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Diffuse Axonal Injury after Head Trauma. A Review

  • J. Sahuquillo
  • M. A. Poca
Part of the Advances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery book series (NEUROSURGERY, volume 27)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury is a major health problem in all developed countries. Because of the long-term disabilities suffered by head-injured patients, such injuries are a continuous organizational challenge for health systems and a burden for community and families in terms of monetary cost, suffering and disability (Fearnside MR et al. 1997).

Keywords

Head Injury Axonal Injury Severe Head Injury Diffuse Axonal Injury Diffuse Brain Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Sahuquillo
    • 1
  • M. A. Poca
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryVall d’Hebron University HospitalBarcelonaSpain

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