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Borderline Personality Disorder and the Family

  • Jill M. Hooley
  • George M. Dominiak

Abstract

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a major clinical problem. It is arguably the most severe form of personality pathology that mental health professionals treat. It is also the most common personality disorder found in clinical settings worldwide (Loranger et al., 1994). With a prevalence of approximately 15% among psychiatric outpatients (Widiger and Weissman, 1991) and an estimated prevalence of 1-2% in the general population (Swartz et al., 1990), borderline patients are not few in number. Moreover, because BPD is typically a chronic form of psychopathology characterized by a high level of suffering on the part of the patient and a suicide rate of around 10% (Paris, 1999), it is a disorder that demands clinical and empirical attention.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Borderline Personality Disorder Personality Disorder Childhood Sexual Abuse Family Environment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Wien 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jill M. Hooley
  • George M. Dominiak

There are no affiliations available

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