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Vitamin E binding protein A famin Protects Neuronal Cells in vitro

  • M. Heiser
  • B. Hutter-Paier
  • L. Jerkovic
  • R. Pfragner
  • M. Windisch
  • M. Becker-André
  • H. Dieplinger
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission. Supplementa book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 62)

Abstract

Afamin, an 87kDa human plasma glycoprotein with specific binding properties for vitamin E (a-tocopherol) was recently characterized ([Jerkovic, 1997]; [Vögele, 1999]). In the present study the in vitro effects on neuronal cells of native human Afamin, of Afamin pre-loaded with vitamin E (Afamin+), and of vitamin E were investigated. Isolated cortical chicken neurons were maintained either under apoptosis-inducing low serum conditions or exposed to oxidative stress by the addition of H2O2 or beta-amyloid peptide25–35. Afamin and vitamin E synergistically enhance the survival of cortical neurons under apoptotic conditions. Furthermore, Afamin alone protects cortical neurons from cell death in both experimental settings. Therefore, the plasma glycoprotein Afamin apparently displays a neuroprotective activity not only by virtue of binding and transporting vitamin E but also on its own.

Keywords

Cortical Neuron Neuronal Viability Micromolar Affinity Brain Pathophysiology Free Radical Oxidative Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Heiser
    • 1
    • 3
  • B. Hutter-Paier
    • 1
  • L. Jerkovic
    • 2
  • R. Pfragner
    • 3
  • M. Windisch
    • 1
  • M. Becker-André
    • 2
  • H. Dieplinger
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.JSW Research GmbHGraz
  2. 2.Vitateq Biotechnology GmbHInnsbruck
  3. 3.Institute for PathophysiologyKarl-Franzens-UniversityGraz
  4. 4.Institute of Medical Biology and Human GeneticsUniversity of InnsbruckAustria

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