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Interactive, Evolutionary Textured Sound Composition

  • Sidney Fels
  • Jonatas Manzolli
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

We describe a system that maps the interaction between two people to control a genetic process for generating music. We start with a population of melodies encoded genetically. This population is allowed to breed every biological cycle creating new members of the population based upon the semantics of the spatial relationship between two people moving in a large, physical space. A pre-specified hidden melody is used to select a melody from the population to play every musical cycle. The overlapping of selected melodies provides an intriguing textured musical space.

Keywords

Genetic Algorithm Crossover Probability Algorithmic Composition Computer Music Interactive Genetic Algorithm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sidney Fels
    • 1
  • Jonatas Manzolli
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Interdisciplinary Nucleus for Studies on Sound Communication (NICS)University of Campinas (UNICAMP)CampinasBrazil

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