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Non-Conventional Interfaces using Stamp Controllers

  • Hugh Mallinder
  • Huw Jones
Conference paper
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

Artists continue to search for new methods of creation of artworks. The trend to interactive multimedia installation work requires systems that allow participants to interact in subtle ways. The paper describes a number of non-conventional interfaces to computer mediated art works achieved using small Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) called ‘Stamps’. These are programmed in BASIC and can be interfaced to personal computers or used as stand alone devices. They are cheap and extremely versatile in their use for non-conventional interfaces.

Keywords

Shape Memory Alloy Programmable Logic Controller Macintosh Computer Programmable Logic Controller Integrate Circuit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh Mallinder
    • 1
  • Huw Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Lansdown Centre for Electronic ArtsMiddlesex UniversityBarnetUK

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