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Compounds of Order II

  • Frank L. Schneider
Part of the Monographien aus dem Gebiete der Qualitativen Mikroanalyse book series (MIKROANANALYSE, volume 2)

Abstract

This order consists of compounds which contain nitrogen in addition to carbon, hydrogen, and possibly oxygen. It can be divided into two suborders, namely, the colored and the colorless compounds. Inasmuch as the former is quite small, no separate tables for them have been included in the present volume. The order, however, is divided into three genera. The division is based upon the results of titrations which place the substance into one of the following: Genus 1, acidic species; Genus 2, basic species; and Genus 3, neutral species. The titrations and divisions are summarized in Table 19.

Keywords

Sodium Hydroxide Primary Amine Tertiary Amine Test Substance Nitro Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank L. Schneider
    • 1
  1. 1.Queens College of the City University of New YorkUSA

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