Advertisement

HBcAg induced T-cell independent anti-HBc production in chronic HBsAg carriers

  • S. P. E. Sylvan
  • U. B. Hellström
  • G. Fei
  • H. Norder
  • L. Magnius
  • G. Lindh
Part of the Archives of Virology book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 4)

Summary

The capacity of the nucleocapsid protein of HBV to function as a T-cell independent antigen in man was studied. When T-cell depleted B-cell cultures were challenged with E coli-derived HBcAg, anti-HBc production was registered in culture supernatants from the majority of chronic HBsAg carriers in a quiescent stage of disease. In contrast, similarly prepared and stimulated cultures from donors with natural acquired immunity to hepatitis B or HB-susceptible controls were non-responsive. Addition of autologous T-cells effectively restored anti-HBc responsiveness in T-cell depleted B-cell cultures from HB-immune donors, demonstrating the T-cell dependency for anti-HBc induction in natural HBV-infection.

Keywords

Core Antigen Quiescent Stage Chronic HBsAg Carrier Immune Donor Human Immune Seron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bazin H, Turk JL, Zanetti M, Glotz D, McGhee JR, Eldridge JH, Beagley KW, Kiyono H, Ernst PB, Bienenstock J, Colle J-H, Truffa-Bachi P, Bach JF (1988) 21st forum in immunology: Is antiinfectious defence thymus-dependent? Ann Inst Pasteur/Immunol 139: 119–222Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Colucci G, Beazer Y, Cantaluppi C, Tackney C (1988) Identification of a major hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) determinant by using synthetic peptides and monoclonal antibodies. J Immunol 141: 4376–4380Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Francis MJ, Hastings GZ, Brown AL, Grace KG, Rowlands DJ, Brown F, Clarke BE (1990) Immunological properties of hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87: 2545–2549PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hellström U, Sylvan S, Lundbergh P (1985) Regulatory functions of T- and accessory-cells for hepatitis B surface antigen induced specific antibody production and proliferation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. J Clin Lab Immunol 16:173–181PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Milich DR, Jones JE, McLachlan A, Houghten R, Thornton GB, Hughes JL (1989) Distinction between immunogenicity and tolerogenicity among HBcAg T cell determinants. J Immunol 143: 3148–3156PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Milich DR, McLachlan A (1986) The nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus is both a T-cell-independent and a T-cell-dependent antigen. Science 234: 1398–1401PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Milich DR, McLachlan A, Hughes JL, Jones JE, Stahl S, Wingfield P, Thornton GB (1989) Characterization of the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid as an immunologic carrier moiety. In: Lerner RA, Ginsberg H, Chanock RM, Brown F (eds) Vaccines 1989: Modern approaches to new vaccines including prevention of AIDS. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, pp 37–42Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Mond JJ, Brunswick M (1987) A role for IFN-y and NK cells in immune responses to T cell-regulated antigens type 1 and 2. Immunol Rev 99: 105–117PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Norder H, Hammas B, Magnius L (1990) Typing of hepatitis B virus genomes by a simplified polymerase chain reaction. J Med Virol 31: 215–221PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Robbins JB, Schneerson R (1990) Polysaccharide-protein conjugates: a new generation of vaccines. J Infect Dis 161: 821–832PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Salfeld J, Pfaff E, Noah M, Schaller H (1989) Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus. J Virol 63: 798–808PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Scott DW (1984) Mechanisms in immune tolerance CRC. Crit Rev Immunol 5: 1–25PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Siber GR, Schur PH, Aisenberb AC, Weitzman SA, Schiffman G. Correlation between serum IgG-2 concentrations and the antibody response to bacterial polysaccharide antigens. N Engl J Med 303: 178–182Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Stahl SJ, Murray K (1989) Immunogenicity of peptide fusions to hepatitis B virus core antigen. Proc Natl Acad Sei USA 86: 6283–6287CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Wen YM, Duan SC, Howard CR, Frew AF, Steward MW (1990) The affinity of anti-HBc antibodies in acute and chronic hepatitis B infection. Clin Exp Immunol 79: 83–86PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. P. E. Sylvan
    • 1
  • U. B. Hellström
    • 1
  • G. Fei
    • 1
  • H. Norder
    • 2
  • L. Magnius
    • 2
  • G. Lindh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Infectious Diseases. Karolinska InstThe Elias Bengtsson Research UnitStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of VirologyThe National Bacteriological LaboratoryStockholmSweden

Personalised recommendations