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Detection of transcriptionally active hepatitis B virus DNA in peripheral mononuclear blood cells after infection during immunosuppressive chemotherapy using the polymerase chain reaction

  • R. Repp
  • A. Mance
  • C. Keller
  • S. Rhiel
  • W. H. Gerlich
  • F. Lampert
Part of the Archives of Virology book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 4)

Summary

Using PCR we have studied mononuclear peripheral blood leucocytes (PMBLs) from HBV-infected immunosuppressed patients in order to detect the presence of HBV genomes. Our results indicate that non-transient PMBL infection is common in immunotolerant carriers. In addition, the presence of pregenomic mRNA sequences suggests that virus replication may take place in PMBLs, possibly implicating the latter as a source of virus after replication has ceased in the liver.

Keywords

Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Leukocyte Polymerase Chain Reaction Amplifiable Fragment Mononuclear Peripheral Blood Leucocyte 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Repp
    • 1
  • A. Mance
    • 1
  • C. Keller
    • 1
  • S. Rhiel
    • 1
  • W. H. Gerlich
    • 2
  • F. Lampert
    • 1
  1. 1.Children’s Hospital, Pediatric ClinicUniversity of GiessenGiessenFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Department of Medical MicrobiologyUniversity of GöttingenFederal Republic of Germany

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