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The Notion of State and Its Implications in Thermodynamics of Inelastic Solids

  • E. T. Onat
Part of the IUTAM Symposia book series (IUTAM)

Summary

A definition of state based on the observable histories of displacement gradients, temperature, internal energy and stress is introduced. When the state space is finite dimensional, thermomechanical behavior of the material in the range of finite deformations can be represented by differential equations. The nature of this representation and the restrictions placed upon it by the second law of thermodynamics are discussed.

Keywords

Distinct State Material Element Finite Deformation Displacement Gradient Rigid Body Rotation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. T. Onat
    • 1
  1. 1.New HavenUSA

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