Advertisement

Interaction between Long Chain Electrolytes and Proteins

  • H. L. Booij
  • H. G. Bungenberg de Jong
Part of the Protoplasmatologia book series (PROTOPLASMATOL., volume 1 / 2)

Abstract

Among the conjugated proteins we find, the lipoproteins, but the nature of this class of proteins is still somewhat mysterious. As regards the binding between protein and lipid several opinions have been brought to the fore, varying between the covalent bond to “physical” association. One of the most conspicuous properties of the lipoproteins is the fact that one cannot extract the lipids with the aid of ether, while extraction does succeed with a mixture of alcohol and ether. Thus it seems that alcohol loosens the binding between lipid and protein. This fact speaks in favour of a physical association between the components of the lipoproteins.

Keywords

Coulomb Force Equilibrium Liquid Maximal Binding Peptide Group Complex Coacervation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bungenberg de Jong, H. G., and C. H. Booij Van Staveren, 1942: Lipophile protein-oleate coacervates and the effect on them of alcohols. Proc. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. 45, 601–606.Google Scholar
  2. — and A. M. van Leeuwen, 1952: Contributions to the problem of the association between proteins and lipids II. Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. B55, 317–346.Google Scholar
  3. — — and C. Mallee, 1952: Contributions to the problem of the association between proteins and lipids IV. Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. B55, 360–372.Google Scholar
  4. — — 1953: Contributions to the problem of the association between proteins and lipids V. Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. B56, 203–217.Google Scholar
  5. — — and A. Recourt, 1952: Contributions to the problem of the association between proteins and lipids III. Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. B55, 347–359.Google Scholar
  6. — and A. Recourt, 1954: Contributions to the problem of the association between proteins and lipids VIII. Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. B57, 204–214.Google Scholar
  7. — C. R. van Someren, and F. Klein, 1954: Contributions to the problem of the association between proteins and lipids VI. Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. B57, 1–19.Google Scholar
  8. — and W. W. H. Weijzen, 1954: Contributions to the problem of the association between proteins and lipids VII. Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. B57, 192–203.Google Scholar
  9. — and W. W. H. Weijzen, 1954: Contributions to the problem of the association between proteins and lipids IX. Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. Amst. B57, 285–310.Google Scholar
  10. Ellis, S. C., and K. G. A. Pankhurst, 1954: Monolayers of collagen. Trans. Faraday Soc. 50, 82–89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Macheboeuf, M., 1953: Lipoproteins of horse plasma and serum. In Tullis (Ed.), Blood cells and plasma proteins. New York, p. 358-377.Google Scholar
  12. Pankhurst, K. G. A., 1949: Formation of complexes between gelatin and sodium alkyl sulphates. In Surface Chemistry, London 1949, p. 109-118.Google Scholar
  13. — 1949: The adsorption of paraffin chain salts to proteins V. Disc. Faraday Soc. 6, 52–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Schulman, J. H., 1949: Disc. Faraday Soc. 6, 58–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag in Vienna 1956

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. L. Booij
    • 1
  • H. G. Bungenberg de Jong
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical ChemistryUniversity of LeidenLeidenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations