Fire Resistance of Minerals and Rocks

  • Erhard M. Winkler
Part of the Applied Mineralogy / Technische Mineralogie book series (MINERALOGY, volume 4)


Fire damage has frequently created problems with building stone and concrete. Urban fires have severely damaged stone, especially granites and quartz-sandstones, but also limestones, dolostones and marbles. Major conflagrations in many European cities during World War II have left behind numerous ruins as cases for detailed studies.


Linear Expansion Linear Thermal Expansion Calcium Hydroxide Building Stone Intense Heating 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erhard M. Winkler
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Science, Department of GeologyUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA

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